004: Deep Passion for the Environment – Clean Water Action With Jessica Rhodes

Jessica explains what it is like being a door-to-door canvasser and how it has helped her in life.

Jessica Rhodes, podcaster, business owner and activist, shares her intense passion for the environment and her involvement with Clean Water Action, a non-profit organization. Jessica explains why this is not just an environmental issue and that the human element involved often gets overlooked because people living in polluted areas are at an economical disadvantage. Jessica’s passion for her cause shines through and she talks about some of the key lessons she has learned from being a door-to-door canvasser.

Key Takeaways:

[3:00] Who is Jessica Rhodes?
[7:15] What is happening at Flint, Michigan?
[10:15] Social injustice happens in poorer areas.
[11:00] Get into your car, drive to these neighborhoods, and actually talk to the people who are suffering.
[12:00] We often miss the human element.
[12:10] Jessica says this is an economic issue as well.
[13:25] This is not happening in just one area. It’s happening all over the states.
[18:50] Canvassers are some of the most hard working people Jessica knows.
[24:10] Jessica’s charity wouldn’t hire people who didn’t care, no matter how good they were. You have to care about the cause.
[26:10] How can we get involved?
[29:55] Believe it or not, canvassers have impact on the people they talk to.
[30:35] We all want this world to be a better place. We all want the same thing, it’s just about how we’re going to get there.
[32:00] Jessica gives a couple of shout outs to people who are currently working hard to give back in their community.
[34:55] Drink the tap water! Stop using bottled water!

Mentioned in This Episode:

www.givingbackpodcast.com
www.jessicarhodes.biz/
www.interviewconnections.com/
www.cleanwateraction.org/

Tweetables:

“I didn’t learn this stuff in the media. I learned it by talking to people face-to-face at their homes.”

“One of the things we often miss is the human element and also the fact that it happens in these poor neighborhoods.”
“When people are so economically disadvantaged, they don’t even have the money to fight this bigger issue.”

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